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John Douthit, Senior[1, 2]

Male 1709 - 1783  (74 years)


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  • Name John Douthit 
    Suffix Senior 
    Religion 1709  Coleraine, , Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Raised Presbyterian 
    Born 9 May 1709  Coleraine, , Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • John was born in the little fort town of Coleraine, Ireland. His father was a Quaker, but because the town was a staunch Presbyterian town, John was sprinkled as a baby in the Presbyterian church in town. He also was brought up in the church until the family immigrated to America around 1724.
    Coleraine, Ireland. The red dot indicates where the old church is located
    Coleraine, Ireland. The red dot indicates where the old church is located
    Christened Jun 1709  Coleraine, , Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Baptized (sprinkled) as a Presbyterian baby and raised in the Presbyterian Church of Coleraine.
    Gender Male 
    Immigration 1723  Monocacy Village, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Immigration to America was a dangerous and miserable endeavor that was undertaken only as a last resort during these times. A family was abandoning friends and relatives, and a way of life they knew for a life that was going to be tough, faced with death and hard times. Conditions had to be very tough when one lived in Europe, with no available alternatives to make such a frightening change. Those in America had a high death rate, and life was still nothing more than a struggle to survive there.

      The ships were built for cargo, not people. Normally a captain would build a temporary deck for passengers over the cargo hold, with flimsy berths that could be dismantled quickly and discarded, once America was reached. There were no other provisions made for passengers, and they were packed aboard with very little space per person.

      People would crowd aboard a ship with their own food supplies and the barest essentials for their life in America. Families would do their best to assemble food items based on (a) the ability not to spoil, (b) take as little space as possible, and (c) yet not weight too much to transport. The normal food stores were potatoes, flour, oatmeal, fried fish, and tea. Water was put in recycled old barrels (like oil barrels), and was usually polluted and rancid early in the voyage.

      The shortest trip was 5 weeks in those deplorable and inhuman conditions. Normally it was a 2 month endeavor and sometimes it would be a trip that lasted 100 days.

      Life aboard the ship was very tough. There was a lot of suffering, no place to go, and rarely anything worth seeing. The use of candles and fires for cooking aboard an old dried out wooden ship, with canvas and ropes, and lots of flammable materials, resulted in ships catching fire easily during the trip.

      Epidemics on the trip were common and lethal. Typhus (ship fever) spread by lice caused a high mortality rate. The ever present sea seasickness, foul atmosphere, poor food, overcrowding, with no ventilation, sanitation, or windows made those that survived real tough people. Storms only made things many times worse!

      It was not all bad times. During good weather the men and boys could help the sailors with their chores. Women and girls could go up on deck and read and talk. There were worship services, singing, and music.

      When they immigrated, Robert would have been about 40 years old; their oldest boy, Solomon would have been around 16 years old, John around 15, Thomas around 13, and David around 11. As Weavers Andrew was a weaver and so had to bring his own loom with him when he immigrated. It also meant that Andrew could not be a farmer, logger, fisherman, or anything that would cause rough hands. His hands had to remain smooth so he could handle thread and not snag his work. Weaving at this time was a family business. Fibers had to be harvested at the precise time from farmers who grew flax and cotton. They had to be carefully dried and prepared. Wool had to be cleaned and processed soon after sheering. It was common practice to make a deal with a farmer to exchange his flax seed for fine fibers from Europe. Women, children, and elderly family members would spin fibers into thread or yarn. The threads and yarn had to be died. The father would run the loom. Because women made "cheap" cloth for sheets and clothing in European factories, the early American weaving family produced things that were made in more complex weaves. They produced rugs, fancy patterned blankets, and intricately weaved colored cloth. While they could produce plain cloth, they usually produced things that were custom made with added weaved elements and color. Unfortunately, the kind of beautiful weaves they made cannot compare to the mass-produced comparatively cheap stuff that industrialism has produced today.
    Coleraine to Philadephia, please!!!
    Coleraine to Philadephia, please!!!
    Employment 1724  New York, New York, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Weaver 
    Employment Abt 1726  Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Weaver 
    Residence Abt 1728  Monocacy Village, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • The normal point of entry into America was through Philadelphia in the early 1700's. After getting off the ship, there would be supplies to obtain, a means to transport the large heavy loom (heavy wagon and animals), and fresh food to find. Kissing the ground was not that unusual either, with great prayers of thanksgiving to God for enabling them to make it. As soon as possible, the trip to find a new home would be undertaken, since staying in town cost money.

      The trip from Philadelphia to Monocacy was over 175 miles, or 10 days of walking, across very rugged terrain. The Susquehanna River was a major obstacle to cross, and so was done as soon as possible after reaching Lancaster. This was at least a weeks' trip from Philadelphia. Once across, the town of York provided food and shelter before continuing the journey. At least one extra day was taken to spend resting and worshipping. Because of the undeveloped, raw nature of the "trails" that served as roads, progress was very slow, and our estimates of speed of travel very optimistic, not taking into account anything like rain, injury to man or animal, sickness, getting lost, attacks by man or animals, etc.

      Maryland was wide open territory that was seeking people to develop the land. The land had been opened in 1634 to settlers, and Roman Catholics held positions of authority. It was also where thousands of British convicts found their new home. In 1649, the Maryland toleration act was passed, making it one of the first laws that gave religious tolerance to those who believed in the Trinity.

      In the 1720's, there were some small groups of Scotch/Irish families that came to the area, among which were the Douthitts. Settling the area was not going well enough, so in 1732, the province governor offered generous land deals. This brought a strong German immigrant population from Pennsylvania to the area.

      The Douthits settled in the oldest town of Maryland, Monocacy. It was just a crossroads, with a church, blacksmith shop and other small buildings. Life there was very rugged and precarious with all the dangers of the wild frontier.

      There were disputes in the 1730's over where the border was actually located between Pennsylvania and Maryland. Each territory deployed armed forces, and the armed fighting ended in 1738, with King George II's negotiated cease fire. The dispute was finally settled in 1767.

      In 1754, France planned to take possession of the British area of North America. George Washington was a Lieutenant Colonel on the Pennsylvania border when he encountered 30 French soldiers preparing to eat their breakfast. He opened fire on them, and 10 soldiers were killed. The French claimed it was a diplomatic group, and retaliated. George Washington quickly tried to build a fort, called Necessity, but it was too small and without provision. When the French army arrived, Washington lost 100 men on the first day of battle, July 3. He was forced to surrender to the French the following day. This was the beginning of the French and Indian War (called the Seven Years War). The British were very angry at George Washington over the surrender because it stated that Washington had killed a diplomat, but under the circumstances, George Washington felt he was given very generous terms. The British refused to offer much in the line of help against the French, but George Washington became well known in his efforts to drive out the French.

      In 1755, the Indians suddenly disappeared from the county. It turned out that the French had been recruiting the Indians to join their side, and were successful. The attacks began against the Scotch/Irish settlers, since they were between the Indian territories and the German settlements. The French and Indians killed, tortured, and burned out the county residents. The only things left in Monocacy were a log church and a few nearby buildings. The colonists had to form their own militias, since the British refused to do much to help them.

      During this time, Maryland residents fled to nearby territories. Even the most stalwart found it too difficult to hold out during seven years of bloody warfare. It cannot be imagined that the Douthits and their children came to the area to fight. Since Andrew was a Quaker, the very opposite was the case. During this war, a census was taken and one son, John, had survived and was in North Carolina with his family. The fate of three of the boys is unknown. Could they have been slaughtered in this war, and even in the first attacks against the settlers? If Andrew was still alive, he would have been 71. The boys would have been 47, 46, 44, and 42 years old, and so very likely had grandchildren.
    Probable Route used when immigrating to Monocacy
    Probable Route used when immigrating to Monocacy
    Residence 19 Feb 1742  Emmitsburg, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    50 Acres 
    • John "Douthet" had 50 acres surveyed just north of Robert Wilson. He called the land "Douthet's Chance." It began at a white oak standing about 50 perches easterly from Flat Run, a branch of Tom's Creek. He sold the land in 1750 to Alexander MacKeen, who enlarged the land by a resurvey. The land was immediately north of present day Emmitsburg.
    Residence 1749  Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • There were 14 court records that mention John Douthit, proving his residency in the area from 1749 to 1751. The last mention is Aug 27, 1751.
    Possessions 21 Nov 1750  Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Douthit's Chance 
    • John Douthit deeded Alexandernder MacKain for 50 pounds the property called Douthit's Chance. Mary, John's wife, relinquished her rights to it as well. There was a natural spring on the property which was to have McKain's dwelling put nearby.
    Residence 1751  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Southwest corner of Wachovia 
    • John moved the family to this sparsely populated area. John would have been around 40, and his wife, Mary around 28. Eliesabetha would have been around 10, John Jr. around 9, Mary around 8; William around 5, and James a little baby.
    Religion 1752  Winston-Salem, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Sometimes went for English Moravian preaching 
    • The actual town where the church services were held was Bethabara, which was near Winston-Salem. While in attendance, John Douthit heard Brother Rogers preach, and the Savior began working in his heart. John Douthit, however, was light-minded and inclined to drink, so the call to Salvation was ignored.
    Chronicle 1752  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Moravians moved to area 
    • The Moravians moved to the area, and John and Mary shared their surplus of food supplies with them. He found them to be upright, friendly people that could be trusted.
    Chronicle Abt 1758  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Several Moravian families move nearby 
    • Several families that knew the Moravians, moved from Carols Manor in Maryland to Hope, North Carolina. John Douthit helped them in word and deed and gladly helped and served the poor. He also helped build a schoolhouse.
    Religion 4 Apr 1763  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Church Society begun 
    • As more English speaking families arrived, the Douthits invited the Brethren to hold services at their house. They formed an English speaking Moravian fellowship, first meeting on this date. When Brother Reichel visited, they formed a small church. John Douthit enjoyed having fellowship with the members, and loved to talk about the conversations he had with them.
    Medical 1780  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Consumption 
    • John began suffering from consumption about this time. This is the old name for tuberculosis, and means he had a chronic cough, blood in his sputum, night sweats, weight loss (hence the name consumption) and fever. It is a tough infection to endure year after year and takes its toll on the victim, gradually weakening the person till death overcomes the body's struggles.
    Religion 1780  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Hope Church 
    • The Douthits donated the land for a church building, and did much of the work of building the Hope Church with Christopher Elrod, Sr.
    Hope Church plaque
    Hope Church plaque
    by Joyce Atkinson, Nov 11, 2009
    Hope Church
    Hope Church
    Photo by Joyce Atkinson, Nov 9, 2009
    Religion 10 Jun 1781  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Church Membership 
    • He was received as a member of the English speaking Moravian church. At this time he accepted the Lord Jesus as his Savior, and he found forgiveness of sins in the blood of Jesus. Even though he had been given to much drink, he completely quit it, and could heartily rejoice over his salvation.

      Both Mary and John became church members. The church maintained strick order and qualifications. Even though John Douthit had hosted and started the church, donated the land, and built the building, he did not qualify for membership until this time!
    Religion 18 Mar 1782  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    First Communion 
    • John Douthit, at the age of 72, on Maudy Thursday, partook of his first Holy Communion, and was so excited, he was like a child! He felt unworthy of salvation and often said, "I came only in the eleventh hour, but the Savior took pity on me, although I had distressed Him and held His grace little worth." Even though he was old, and growing weaker, he never missed a service, unless he must. His children and friends respected him as a father. He prayed earnestly for the salvation of his children.

      After a person applies for church membership, it took a year before they could be accepted to partake of the Lord's Supper (Sacrament). They had to prove their faith was genuine and that they were sincere in their decision to follow the Lord and the Holy Scriptures.
    Died 28 Dec 1783 
    Event 21 Feb 1784  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Knew death was coming soon. 
    • On this day John declared: "The Savior will soon put an end to all my misery and take me unto Himself."
    Death 22 Feb 1784  Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • For several winters John had been very ill, and he had clear signs of consumption, so it was expected he would not make it through the winter. However he seemed well during his last Summer, but as the Winter came, so did his discomfort. He spent many days and nights sleepless in his chair. In spite of the pain, he was patient, talking about his Savior, who gave him peace, comfort and encouragement when things seemed too much to bear. When questioned, he often spoke of the joy in looking toward the moment when he would be taken to see the Savior on Whom he believed. He was refreshed by the hymns that were sung for him.

      He was conscious till his last breath, and passed away gently and peacefully between 4 and 5 am. He had lived for 74 years, and 10 months.
    Possessions Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    640 acres 
    • Property was across the river from Stephen Riddle, Sr.
    Name Ireland Douthit 
    Name John Dondith  [4
    FamilySearch ID# LZJL-GQW 
    Buried 23 Feb 1784  Hope Moravian Church Cemetery, Winston Salem, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Address:
    2759 Hope Church Road 
    Bronze Marker Placement
    Bronze Marker Placement
    From http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=douthit&GSfn=john&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSst=29&GScnty=1684&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=8717640&
    John Douthit Gravestone and Marker
    John Douthit Gravestone and Marker
    From ww.findagrave.com
    John Douthit Sr. DAR plate
    John Douthit Sr. DAR plate
    from Joyce Atkinson, Nov 9, 2009
    John Douthit gravestone
    John Douthit gravestone
    from Joyce Atkinson, Nov 9, 2009
    Person ID I1495  MacomberKin | American Douthits
    Last Modified 3 Feb 2015 

    Father Robert Joseph Douthit,   b. 1684, Coleraine, , Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1738, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Mother Mary Hedge,   b. 1687, Coleraine, , Londonderry, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F529  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Elizabeth Hope Scott,   b. 13 Aug 1721, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1794, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 12 Jan 1738  Monocacy Village, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Nancy Eliesabetha Douthit,   b. 22 Apr 1739, Monocacy, Montgomery, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1790, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
    +2. Reverend John Douthit, Junior,   b. 10 Apr 1740, Monocacy, Montgomery, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jun 1813, Anderson, Anderson, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
    +3. Mary Marcella Douthit,   b. Jun 1743, Monocacy, Montgomery, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1789, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 46 years)
    +4. William Douthit, Senior,   b. 26 Dec 1745, Graceham, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Feb 1799, Rowan, Bladen, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
    +5. James Douthit,   b. 25 Dec 1749, Monocacy, Montgomery, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jun 1780, Surry, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
    +6. Thomas Job Douthit,   b. 4 Feb 1753, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1819, Clemmons, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    +7. Isaac Douthit,   b. 10 Aug 1756, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 May 1823, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    +8. Sarah Frey Douthit,   b. 10 Mar 1759, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Nov 1821, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
    +9. Abraham Douthit, Senior,   b. 9 Mar 1762, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 1828, Lexington, Davidson, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    +10. Rebecca Douthit,   b. 9 Mar 1762, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1833, Clermont, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
    +11. Jacob Douthit,   b. 23 Jul 1765, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1814, Warren, Jefferson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)
     12. Soloman Davis Douthit,   b. 1767, Hope, Forsyth, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 4 Aug 2017 
    Family ID F528  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart